why is the regent honeyeater important

CIRCULARS
February 10, 2020

Regent Honeyeater {Anthochaera phrygia} The Hunter and Mid Coast regions provide important habitat for this critically endangered woodland bird which has become a flagship species for the conservation of declining woodland birds and mammals. You can help Regent Honeyeaters and other woodland birds by: To find out more about saving your state's threatened species check out the Threatened Species Network web site at http://www.wwf.org.au/tsn/index.htm  or call the Network's National Office on (02) 9281 5515. Regent Honeyeaters build open-cup nests in the outer branches of large trees (Franklin et al. Why is our catchment important? We need your help to protect a recently discovered breeding site for the Regent Honeyeater in NSW that has not been affected by the bushfires. King Edward Terrace It is commonly considered a flagship species within its range, with the efforts going into its conservation having positive effects on many other species that share its habitat. It can also feed on insects and spiders, as well as native and cultivated fruits. The Regent Honeyeater is a striking and distinctive, medium-sized, black and yellow honeyeater with a sturdy, curved bill. Regent Honeyeater’s are a medium-sized honeyeater. Habitat destruction is a primary reason for its imperiled status.” The Regent Honeyeater may number as few as 350-400 birds in the wild. They are quite distinctive, with a black head, neck and upper breast, while their back and breast are yellow with black scaling. The regent honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia) is a critically endangered bird endemic to southeastern Australia. Today only twenty-five per cent of the original coverage remains, mostly on less fertile soils which are marginal habitat for this species. It could be all the Regent Honeyeater has left, help us protect it! Although the regent Honeyeater does have predators, it is mainly habitat destruction that threatens it. Conservation efforts are presently focused on protecting and restoring habitat at all regularly-used sites and on increasing the availability of preferred habitat overall. Originally found within 300km of the coast from Brisbane to Adelaide, the Regent Honeyeater is no longer found in South Australia and records from Queensland are now uncommon. Recent genetic research suggests it is closely related to the wattlebirds. The regent honeyeater has a very small chance of surviving in the future, and it was surprising to see how much effort is put into saving a single species [without any guarantee], a species whose habitat we destroyed in an eye blink. The Regent Honeyeater has been badly affected by land-clearing, with the clearance of the most fertile stands of nectar-producing trees and the poor health of many remnants, as well as competition for nectar from other honeyeaters, being the major problems. The Regent Honeyeater is a flagship threatened woodland bird whose conservation will benefit a large suite of other threatened and declining woodland fauna. The regent honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia) is a critically endangered bird endemic to southeastern Australia. Females are smaller and have less black on their throat. The Regent Honeyeater is called the ‘flagship species’ and is the public face of the project as it gives the community a focus and a way to understand the environmental benefits of becoming involved. See Veerman, P.A. The Regent Honeyeaters habitat is Box Iron Bark Forests and woodlands mostly found in Victoria. Their greatest current threat is critically low numbers and ability to Because of habitat loss, the availability of these nesting sites is limited, forcing birds to choose suboptimal nesting locations. However, the future of this important nesting area is uncertain. The Regent Honeyeater, with its brilliant flashes of yellow embroidery, was once seen overhead in flocks of hundreds. We recognise and are grateful for the immense contribution of Indigenous people to the knowledge and conservation of Australia's birds. Contact us. The Barraba/Bundarra area is one of only 3 core breeding areas used by Regent Honeyeaters; the other … Can you make a submission to the NSW Planning Department calling for the protection not development of Fernhill Estate? The nest is located 1-20m off the ground on horizontal branches or forks, or in mistletoe. It forages in flowers or foliage, but sometimes comes down to the ground to bathe in puddles or pools, and may also hawk for insects on the wing. more aggressive honeyeaters such as Red Wattle Birds, Friarbirds and Noisy Miners, and increased nest predation by Pied Currawongs. This was very exciting news indeed, as there were only 4 other successful nests recorded during the entire 2019 season. Protecting remnant woodland in your community or on your land to help provide habitat for all our native animals, including the Regent Honeyeater; Leaving dead and fallen timber on the ground and avoid taking trees with hollows. The species inhabits dry open forest and woodland, particularly Box-Ironbark woodland, and riparian forests of River Sheoak. The Regent Honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia) is a spectacular, black, white and gold, medium-sized honeyeater. Why is this species important? The Regent Honeyeater feeds mainly on nectar from a small number of eucalypt species, acting as a pollinator for many flowering plants. It has been a horrific start to 2020 for many Australian communities, our environment, and our wildlife. Promoting awareness of the Regent Honeyeater and its plight is also an important aspect of conservation measures. Community has role in conservation program Birdlife Australia is working with the Regent Honeyeater Recovery Team and Taronga Zoo to rebuild Regent Honeyeater numbers in eastern NSW. Regent Honeyeaters now have an extremely patchy distribution from Bendigo in Vic through NSW 1989). The Capertee Valley, and nearby areas of the Blue Mountains, are one of the most important remaining areas for the Regent Honeyeater. It once could be found as far west as Adelaide, but is now gone from South Australia and western Victoria. The Court added: “Preservation of this area is therefore of vital importance to the long term survival of the species. A great many Australian plants are fertilised by honeyeaters, particularly the Proteaceae, Myrtaceae, and Ericaceae. But lots of other bird, mammal and insect species are benefitting from the restoration works. Its population is now scattered, and the only breeding habitat is in north-eastern Victoria and the central coast of New South Wales. Through partnerships between government agencies, non-government organisations, community groups and landholders, efforts are being made to protect the Regent Honeyeater's habitat and ensure this species continues to exist in the wild. Its head is black with a cream eye-patch, the upper breast is black, flowing to speckled black, and its lower breast is pale lemon. Canberra ACT 2601 The Regent Honeyeater is a generalist forager, although it feeds mainly on the nectar from a relatively small number of eucalypts that produce high volumes of nectar. We need your help to let them know that this area is critical to the future of our Regent Honeyeaters and should be valued and protected. The Regent Honeyeater exhibits unusual behaviour, in that particularly during winter, isolated individuals of this species associate with and then often mimic the calls of wattlebirds and friarbirds. In males, the dark eye is surrounded by yellowish warty bare skin. Regent Honeyeaters occur mainly in dry box ironbark open-forest and woodland areas inland of the Great Dividing Range, particularly favouring those on the wettest, most fertile soils, such a… When European settlers first arrived in Australia, Regent Honeyeaters were common and widespread throughout the box-ironbark country of southeastern Australia, from about 100km north of Brisbane through sub-coastal and central New South Wales, Victoria inland of the ranges, and as far west as the Adelaide Hills. Our hearts reach out to everyone who has been impacted by the bushfire season, or who are now coping with the effects of the COVID19 pandemic. Regent Honeyeaters inhabit woodlands that support a significantly high abundance and species richness of bird species. Regent honeyeater. Historically it ranged from Adelaide through Vic and eastern NSW to Dalby in Qld, extending from the coast to the western slopes of the Great Dividing Range. The Regent Honeyeater feeds mainly on nectar and other plant sugars. It is known that the honeyeaters are important in New Zealand (see Anthornis) as well, and assumed that the same applies in other areas. They spend much of their time feeding on the nectar from eucalypts such as the Mugga Ironbark, White Box and Yellow Box, and Blakeley's Red Gum on which they are reliant. Key eucalypt species include Mugga Ironbark, Yellow Box, White Box and Swamp Mahogany. Early last week BirdLife Australia’s NSW woodland bird project manager Mick Roderick found a flock of eight Regent Honeyeaters in flowering Swamp Mahogany near the Neranie access road, Myall Lakes NP, on the coast of NSW. Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment, Threatened species & ecological communities, Threatened species and ecological communities publications, Listed species and ecological community permits, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, © Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment. The Regent Honeyeater was once a common woodland bird. Other tree species may be regionally important. In even better news, the pair successfully raised and fledged a chick! The species inhabits dry open forest and woodland, particularly Box-Ironbark woodland, and riparian forests of River Sheoak. Special dietary and habitat needs, in particular the Regent Honeyeater's nomadic lifestyle and reliance on a small area of favoured habitat within the remnants, has meant that these reductions in habitat are having a huge impact on the species. The Regent Honeyeater was once common in wooded areas eastern Australia, especially along the inland slopes of the Great Dividing Range. It’s been an important week for the Regent Honeyeater recovery program. increasingly important criterion as to whether or not a project aimed at saving or restoring habitat will have a long-term, positive outcome. Image: Regent Honeyeater by Andrew Silcocks. Mating season of regent honeyeaters takes place from August to January. The few remaining honeyeaters live along the east coast of Australia. Although many birds use vocal copying behaviour, no other bird species is known to use vocal mimicry of close relatives in this way. The next Regent Honeyeater survey will take place in October 2017. Due to expanding agriculture eighty-five percent of the box-ironbark woodlands, once extensively distributed across inland eastern Australia, have been cleared, making them one of the most threatened ecosystems in the country. A tracking device small enough to fit on the regent honeyeater is being tested on the back of a mounted specimen. Regent honeyeaters occasionally gather in flocks with wattlebirds and friarbirds during the winter and frequently mimic calls of these (closely related) types of birds. It is commonly considered a flagship species within its range, with the efforts going into its conservation having positive effects on many other species that share its habitat. BirdLife Australia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Country on which we live and work, and we pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging. Thirty-six of the 44 captive-bred Regent Honeyeaters released in the Chiltern-Mt Pilot National Park two weeks ago have been confirmed at home in the wild. The clearance of the most fertile stands, the poor health of many remnants and very slow growth rate of replacement trees as well as the lack of regeneration due to stock grazing are also contributing to the decline in numbers. When nectar was scarce, however, Regent Honeyeaters spent up to 90% of their foraging time feeding on lerp, honeydew and insects. Today the Regent Honeyeater has become a 'flagship species' for conservation in the threatened box-ironbark forests of Victoria and NSW on which it depends. Our hearts reach out to everyone who has been impacted by the bushfire season, or who are now coping with the effects of the COVID19 pandemic. •The Regent Honeyeater is a flagship threatened woodland bird whose conservation will benefit a large suite of other threatened and declining woodland fauna. With an estimated wild population of less than 350 individuals in the wild, any recruitment chicks that are successfully raised are cause for celebration. The species inhabits dry open forest and woodland, particularly Box-Ironbark woodland, and riparian forests of River Sheoak. Its head, neck, throat, upper breast and bill are black and the back and lower breast are pale lemon in colour with a black scalloped pattern. … Loss of their woodland habitat is the major threat to this species and to other woodland birds. The remaining population in Victoria and NSWis patchy, with little information available on the movement patterns of this highly mobile species. The important links between the trees of the box-ironbark woodlands of Victoria and the endangered Regent Honeyeater became clear as the fascinated group of adults and children listened to the stories and the science during the Ballarat Region Treegrowers excursion to the Regent Honeyeater Project based in Benalla, Victoria. Last year a pair of Regent Honeyeaters, one of Australia’s most rare and threatened birds, were observed breeding along a creek-line on Fernhill Estate, near Mulgoa in Western Sydney. Adult plumage is predominantly black with bright yellow edges to the tail and wing feathers, while the body feathers (except for the head and neck) are broadly edged in pale yellow or white. The biggest threat to the Regent Honeyeater is the loss of habitat. You can also find out more information about Australia's threatened species by calling the Department of the Environment and Heritage's Community Information Unit on free call 1800 803 772, John Gorton Building With its prettily patterned breast, the regent honeyeater is striking and distinctive. Why is it threatened? It has a bare, corrugated pale face, giving rise to … These stunning birds help maintain healthy populations of our iconic eucalyptus trees through pollination, providing important food and habitat for many other native animals. 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